The Dirty Dozen & The Clean 15

The Environmental Working Group has come out with the latest and greatest list for making healthy produce choices.  It’s called the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides which includes the “Dirty Dozen“ —a list of the 12 fruits and vegetables highest in pesticide residue — so buy organic if you can,  and the “Clean 15″ -the produce lowest in pesticide residues.  It’s very interesting to compare this year’s list with last year’s.  Celery, which formerly was the fourth filthiest produce pick, is now top of the heap. Pears and lettuce dropped off the Dirty Dozen list this year (though they’re still not the cleanest). And blueberries and kale got the honor of joining the list this round—blueberries rank fifth for pesticide residue and kale ranks ninth.

THE DIRTY DOZEN

1. Celery

2. Peaches

3. Strawberries

4. Apples

5. Blueberries

6.  Nectarines

7. Bell Peppers

8. Spinach

9. Kales

10. Cherries

11. Potatoes

12. Grapes (Imported)

THE CLEAN 15

1. Onion

2. Avocado

3. Sweet Corn

4. Pineapple

5. Mango

6. Sweet Peas

7. Asparagus

8. Kiwi

9. Cabbage

10. Eggplant

11. Cantaloupe

12. Watermelon

13. Grapefruit

14. Sweet Potato

15. Honeydew Melon

Here’s a link to a printer-friendly version.   Happy Shopping!

http://www.foodnews.org/sneak/EWG-shoppers-guide.pdf

Why Should You Care About Pesticides?
The growing consensus among scientists is that small doses of
pesticides and other chemicals can cause lasting damage to human
health, especially during fetal development and early childhood.
Scientists now know enough about the long-term consequences of
ingesting these powerful chemicals to advise that we minimize our
consumption of pesticides.
What’s the Difference?
EWG research has found that people who eat five fruits and
vegetables a day from the Dirty Dozen list consume an average of
10 pesticides a day. Those who eat from the 15 least contaminated
conventionally-grown fruits and vegetables ingest fewer than 2
pesticides daily. The Guide helps consumers make informed choices
to lower their dietary pesticide load.
Will Washing and Peeling Help?
The data used to create these lists is based on produce tested as
it is typically eaten (meaning washed, rinsed or peeled, depending
on the type of produce). Rinsing reduces but does not eliminate
pesticides. Peeling helps, but valuable nutrients often go down the
drain with the skin. The best approach: eat a varied diet, rinse all
produce and buy organic when pos
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About Shawna Page

Shawna Page is the founder and CEO of femMED. Following a 20-year career in the investment banking industry, Shawna was ready to settle down and take on a new challenge: early retirement and being a full-time mother to her three children. Little did she realize she would be back in the saddle after only 3 weeks. Living a healthy lifestyle has always been a top priority, and over the years Shawna had gained a tremendous amount of knowledge in the natural health world, but more importantly, she became very aware of the consumer pitfalls as well. Searching the store aisles for the right supplement was frustrating and confusing. There was no trusted brand just for women. That, combined with the lack of natural options available to women, gave birth to her desire to simplify things and she created femMED, the first ever consumer friendly all-natural solution to women’s most common health concerns.

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