millie says pears, pears everywheres

Worldwide, there are over 30 primary and subspecies of edible pears, Pyrus spp., with China responsible for 12 of the 20 million tonnes produced yearly.  Related to the apple, there is no reason to travel the world for the chance to sample a good pear, nor reason for that same pear to have to come visit you, as many pear species bode well in cold temperatures.  A deciduous pear tree, but not an evergreen, may withstand temperatures plunging to -40 °C.  There is in fact some evidence that fruits fairing better in harsher climates produce a greater nutrient density, the pear being an example. Most nutrients from the pear are found in the skin, with studies showing that organic fruits produce even more antioxidants than conventional fruits.  Local varieties such as Bartlett, Beurre, Bosc, Comice, D’Anjou, Forelle, Peckham, Red, Red D’Anjou, and Seckel claim significant quantities of cancer protective phenolic compounds whereas Asian, Asian brown, Korean, and Korean Shinko have been found to contain only trace.  In fact 32 different phenolic and flavonoid glycosides have been found in different varieties of pear skins, with research showing pears are helpful in protecting against lung and colon cancer.  A high fibre content also makes pears good for the digestive and urinary system.  And, the be-all-and-end-all of the moment, one study even showed that 3 pears (or apples) per day can help induce weight loss, whereas 3 oat bars, can not.  Hope you enjoy these tasty pomes, daily.

originally posted at www.notfarfromthetree.org

xox dr millie lytle nd

Share this with your friends!
Facebook Twitter Email Linkedin
This entry was posted in Women's Health by Dr. Millie Lytle. Bookmark the permalink.
avatar

About Dr. Millie Lytle

Dr. Millie Lytle holds an undergraduate in Sociology from the University of Toronto (1998), her N.D. from The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (2002) and her Master’s of Public Health from the University of Hamburg of Applied Sciences, Germany (2010), for which she wrote her thesis on the integration of NDs into Community Health Centres. She has practiced and lectured in various integrated clinical settings, including the START Clinic for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, The 519 Church Street Community Centre and Lakeshore Area Multi-Service Project (L.A.M.P.) She has been interviewed for Viva magazine, Now magazine’s Alt Health, Adria Vasil’s Ecoholic and Damian Roger’s Wellness in Eye Weekly. She has also appeared on television programs including Breakfast Television, Food Jammers and Global News. She has been published in Naturopathic Doctor News and Review.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

By posting a comment, you agree to this site's Commenting Guidelines