Eggs: Are They All They’re Cracked Up to Be?

Over the years, eggs have developed a bad rap. Some people had gone so far as to suggest that eggs should be removed completely from your diet because they are loaded with a dangerous amount of cholesterol even for a healthy heart. With new
scientific discoveries though, eggs are making a comeback. In fact, they seem
to have done a full 180 and are now being touted for all their health benefits.

While it is true that egg yolks contain cholesterol and may weakly affect blood cholesterol levels, it turns out they also contain nutrients that help lower the risk of
heart disease.

Eggs Contain:

Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 has been shown to help protect against
heart disease.
Choline This nutrient plays an important function for the
nervous system, helping to control memory and muscle support.
Vitamin D Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin, which a lot of
North Americans lack in the winter.
Protein Eggs are a complete protein, containing all the essential amino acids. Protein plays an essential role in building, maintaining, and replacing tissues in the body.

Over the years, eggs were ‘rumoured’ to be bad for the heart because they contain cholesterol. Recent research indicates, however, that blood cholesterol levels are more influenced by the saturated and trans-fats we eat rather than by the cholesterol in foods. This means that our bodies are not absorbing the cholesterol from foods at a rate even close to the extent that was thought in the past. On top of this, eggs contain Vitamin B12, which is one of the vitamins for heart health. This is a great natural supplement if you’re wondering how to prevent heart disease in women or men!

How much cholesterol do we need?
The recommended daily cholesterol intake for a healthy person is not more than 300 milligrams per day.  In healthy people, an egg a day will not increase the risk of heart disease and can be part of a healthy diet. Women with heart disease should limit dietary cholesterol to less than 200 mg per day, but you can still have eggs up to 3 times per week.

One egg contains:

  • 185mg of cholesterol, all of which is found in the
    yolk
  •  5 grams of fat, most of which is the ‘good’ unsaturated fat and there is no trans-fat
  • 6 grams of protein

So what are your options if you suffer from heart disease and/or are trying to limit your eggs?
Have an omelet with one egg yolk and 3 egg whites. Egg whites are pure protein! You can add as many vegetables as you like.
Eggs are filling, inexpensive and easy to prepare, so start incorporating them into your diet!

By the way…What’s the difference between white eggs and brown eggs?
As it turns out, not a whole lot! Brown eggs come from brown hens, and white eggs come from white hens!

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