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About Dr. Millie Lytle

Dr. Millie Lytle holds an undergraduate in Sociology from the University of Toronto (1998), her N.D. from The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (2002) and her Master’s of Public Health from the University of Hamburg of Applied Sciences, Germany (2010), for which she wrote her thesis on the integration of NDs into Community Health Centres. She has practiced and lectured in various integrated clinical settings, including the START Clinic for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, The 519 Church Street Community Centre and Lakeshore Area Multi-Service Project (L.A.M.P.) She has been interviewed for Viva magazine, Now magazine’s Alt Health, Adria Vasil’s Ecoholic and Damian Roger’s Wellness in Eye Weekly. She has also appeared on television programs including Breakfast Television, Food Jammers and Global News. She has been published in Naturopathic Doctor News and Review.

Get your free vitamin D while the sun is high and your shadow, short.

Depending on your age and color of your skin, choose the length of time with an exposed body part to maximize daily Vitamin D production. Some studies say short exposure each day over the hottest days in the summer will produce enough vitamin D for the whole year, but in the winter there is always cod liver oil or vitamin D supplementation.

Determine the length of time needed based on the following estimates:

the lightest: newborn 5 minutes, child 10 minutes, teen 15 minutes, adult 20 minutes
the darkest: 30 minutes for newborn, 1 hour for a child, 1.5 hours for a teen, adult 2 hours

natural oils on your skin are needed for the conversion of cholesterol to vitamin D so leave skin unwashed for 20 minutes before and after sun exposure

Rotate the exposed part each day maximum for skin cancer prevention.

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millie says: Serviceberries

Serviceberries, of the Amelanchier spp., are indigenous to most every part of Canada and the US, possibly putting ‘Saskatoon’ on the map. Other colloquial names refer to their seasonal availability, such as juneberry.

From slightly tart to nutty sweet, these nutritious delicacies are used to flavour Native American Pemmican. They and appear just as the shad run, hence another name: shadbush.

Because of their dark red-blue-black colorings the ripe berries are jam-packed with proantho-antioxidants. Doctrine of signatures from Chinese as well as Iroquois herbal traditions place them among the blood-building kind due to their dark colors, especially for nourishing mom after childbirth. Phenolic acids have been isolated from European Juneberries unveiling the health benefits of these dark little berries, providing a mechanism for positively affecting blood pressure and blood circulation.

Careful eating them before harvest, as they may induce vomiting when unripe, a popular use for them in 18 and 19th century Europe.



xox dr millie lytle nd

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millie says mulberries

Mulberries, Morus spp., native to warm and tropical areas of each continent have a long history of medicinal use.  Used for centuries in Chinese and folklore medicine, as a remedy for many kinds of diseases, these little gems are actually a-group-of-fruit-within-a-fruit.  They can be found clumped together in long and short varieties.  Ranging from white, burgundy to black in color and insipid to sugary in flavour, all are beneficial for their antioxidisingpolyphenols.  These powerful phyto(plant)chemicals known specifically as anthocyanidins especially persistent in all dark-colored berries, have been extensively researched for different healthful propertie: from blood-thinning to natural liver cleansing.  A specifically potent antioxidant called resveritrol benefits adrenal function, therefore helping buffer stress in the body.  High breeding-ability holds promise in the functional food industry…but for lovers of slow food and ancient-strains, such as myself, they are a Dionysian dream, rivaling the grape in their wine-making potential and the pomegranate, in cancer-fighting juice.

xox dr millie lytle nd
original post can be found at www.notfarfromthetree.org

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millie says, eat plums

Covering the spectrum of the rainbow within one fruit are…plums (Prunus subgenus prunus). These tasty drupes, juicy sweet or tangy-tart, share membership in the rose family with several other favourites; cherry, peach, apricot, apple, pear, quince, almond and even olive. The impressively colored flesh, especially when the fruit is fully ripe, contains an abundance of ….you guessed it…cell-strengthening antioxidants. Specifically, the antioxidants found in plums help protect the very-important fatty tissue of the brain, preventing dementia and macular degeneration, therefore helping us think and see clearly. Plums are a favorite edible-medicinal in Japan, China, many parts of Europe, Africa and North America for a variety of reasons. In North America, it is the variety Prunus domestica when dried, a ‘prune’ is known for its incredible fibre content but fresh plums are also a good food to smooth the transmission time of the digestive system due to high contents of dietary fibre, sorbitol and isatin. Dried plums, prunes and other newer functional varieties, have also been shown to improve bone health by inhibiting bone cell destruction and increase iron absorption, due to high content of vitamin C. Don’t let plum season go-by without gobbeling up your share. And during hte winter, count on dried and naturally-preserved versions to provide off-season benefits.
originally posted at www.notfarfromthetree.org

xox dr millie lytle nd

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millie says pears, pears everywheres

Worldwide, there are over 30 primary and subspecies of edible pears, Pyrus spp., with China responsible for 12 of the 20 million tonnes produced yearly.  Related to the apple, there is no reason to travel the world for the chance to sample a good pear, nor reason for that same pear to have to come visit you, as many pear species bode well in cold temperatures.  A deciduous pear tree, but not an evergreen, may withstand temperatures plunging to -40 °C.  There is in fact some evidence that fruits fairing better in harsher climates produce a greater nutrient density, the pear being an example. Most nutrients from the pear are found in the skin, with studies showing that organic fruits produce even more antioxidants than conventional fruits.  Local varieties such as Bartlett, Beurre, Bosc, Comice, D’Anjou, Forelle, Peckham, Red, Red D’Anjou, and Seckel claim significant quantities of cancer protective phenolic compounds whereas Asian, Asian brown, Korean, and Korean Shinko have been found to contain only trace.  In fact 32 different phenolic and flavonoid glycosides have been found in different varieties of pear skins, with research showing pears are helpful in protecting against lung and colon cancer.  A high fibre content also makes pears good for the digestive and urinary system.  And, the be-all-and-end-all of the moment, one study even showed that 3 pears (or apples) per day can help induce weight loss, whereas 3 oat bars, can not.  Hope you enjoy these tasty pomes, daily.

originally posted at www.notfarfromthetree.org

xox dr millie lytle nd

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